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Gerlach: Those gizmos frame left appear to be actual phone booths or extraterrestrial worm hole transports. Either way: To hell with cell phones!

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what a wonderful trip down memory lane. I remember those early cameras, too. I took a summer intensive at Rocky Mountain School of Photography in Missoula when I first moved to Montana in the 90's. loved working in the dark room, even built one in our house in Lakeside - never developed a damn thing in it. when we sold the house I tried to sell the never used developer - by that time all was digital. ended up donating to the college. hope some romantic for old school photography has gotten some use from it.

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Thank you, tabby. I actually enjoyed digital, and I looked back at film through a rose colored lens. Digital helps me to get what I see a little more easily but I hate pitting one against the other.

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I got my first real camera when I was about 13. That would be 1963. It was a 35 mm. In my early years as a journalist, I often developed my own film. At one point I had a dark room set up in my apartment bathroom, with a piece of plywood over the tub.

One thing I do appreciate about digital photography, at least on my iPhone, is that the camera records the time and place. I have a lot of slides that I am uncertain of where and when they were shot.

Your photos are lovely and evocative.

Did you ever use Fuji Velvia? My daughter shot some amazing photos with it. Its color is almost cartoonish, very saturated.

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Thanks, Fran! The time and date thing - I never used it, but do you remember the old film point and shoots that would burn a time and date onto the shot? Forever, on the negative. That was like a 90s thing. And I loved Velvia. Used to shoot Velvia 50 and 200, but the 50 was amazingly saturated and I loved that.

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Yes, Lyza used 50. Saturated.

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One of my favorites, Paul. This memoir through the literal lens of a camera is stunning. Those ice cube shaped, rotating camera flashes! Brought me back to Papa & Gramma's home in Brooklyn ~ Polaroid photos were the order of the day & I cherish every awkward image. I loved my treks to FotoMat in Bayside, two blocks from home, where I dropped off my film & reclaimed it gleefully a week later. Today's cameras are infinitely easier & more viable, no use denying it. But I remember the palpable excitement of seeing my childhood images. Thank you thank you thank you.

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As always, thank you so much, Ellen!

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